events

Sibling StrifePlay episode Subscribe via RSS Subscribe via iTunesDownload a transcript Sponsored by Rosen Law Firm

Does long-standing sibling rivalry really have an impact on a marriage?

So where does sibling rivalry start in the first place? According to academic professionals at the University of Michigan Health System, the most fundamental effect and characteristic of sibling rivalry is jealousy. Constant arguments between siblings create a strong feeling of tension in the household that’s felt by everyone.

It’s also been suggested that rivalry between siblings has negative effects on the marriage of the parents, as the problems experienced between the siblings begin to make the parents more likely to disagree about who is right and who is wrong in different situations. So what is the best way to ease the tension and quell the rivalries?

Today’s guest is Dr. Kristen Wynns, a child psychologist and parenting, testing and custody specialist and the owner of Wynns Family Psychology. With extensive experience in child and parenting issues, Kristen has seen her fair share of family tension derived from sibling rivalry. According to her, spouses can reduce the negative effects of the rivalry by communicating with each other and presenting a unified front to the children.

The Wynns Family Psychology ‘Sibling Strife’ workshop will be held September 23, 2013 from 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm.

To find out more about Kristen and her practice, visit their website or call (919) 467-7777 to schedule an appointment.

Rekindling Romance During Family VacationPlay episode Subscribe via RSS Subscribe via iTunesDownload a transcript Sponsored by Rosen Law Firm

Is it possible to have a romantic vacation while also making the most of family time?

Perhaps you and your spouse are wanting to take a family vacation. But maybe you’re fearing that your kids with be antsy and bored, and that you and your partner won’t have any time for romance and fun. So what do you do with this dilemma?

Sometimes couples find themselves having completely kid-focused vacations in order to meet the “family togetherness” needs, but they don’t get a chance to pay attention to the marriage during the time off from work and away from home. Or maybe a couple might plan a romantic getaway without the kids because they find it difficult to work on romance with the children around. Either way, someone (…like your child) or something (…like the romance in your marriage) ends up left out of the mix.

According to today’s guest, Erica Blystone– a licensed clinical social worker with Lepage Associates— there are ways to have your cake and eat it too. You, in fact, can go on a family vacation and work on rekindling the romance in your marriage at the same time, and Erica is here to discuss how and give our listeners some pointers.

To find out more about Erica and her practice, visit their website or call (919) 572-0000 to schedule an appointment.

What to Expect When You're Expecting an Empty NestPlay episode Subscribe via RSS Subscribe via iTunesDownload a transcript Sponsored by Rosen Law Firm

What happens to a marriage when parents must begin to prepare for an empty nest?

When parents start to prepare to send their son or daughter off to college they are not only helping to ease the transition into college life for their child, but also paving the way for their own next steps… of marriage and an empty nest, that is. But many families aren’t exactly aware of the challenges that arise with big transitions and changes, and therefore they’re not as proactive as they could be.

Sometimes a couple isn’t really clear on the parenting roles that are played with kids in college. When this is the case, it’s easy for parents to be on different pages– and they might not have a solid plan for how they will respond to different crises and critical issues. With a little guidance, however, it can be easy and uplifting for a couple to get back to a positive place; a place where they successfully parent and maintain a long-standing marriage as a team.

Today’s guest is Dr. Susan Orenstein, the director of Orenstein Solutions. Susan says couples can fix these issues by working together to create plans for the expected and the unexpected. An empty nest doesn’t have to be a bad thing… it can, in fact, be just the beginning.

To find out more about Susan and her practice, visit their website or call (919) 968-8586