sex

Let's Get Physical - Stay Happily MarriedPlay episode Subscribe via RSS Subscribe via iTunesDownload a transcript Sponsored by Rosen Law Firm

How can your commitment to health affect your commitment to the one you love?

Summertime is meant for lounging by the beach, enjoying the sun, and trying to avoid showing the entire world your every physical insecurity. Come autumn, the temperature drops, the leaves change, and everyone’s best friend, the over-sized sweater, makes its triumphant return from the depths of the closet. Just because the temperature is dropping, that doesn’t mean that your waistline will too. With the colder temperatures come the hectic, sleepless schedule filled with holiday parties and filling holiday meals with their seemingly limitless supply of every artery clogging treat your struggling heart can handle.

While many resolve to make up for their holiday splurging with a promise to do better “next year”, it may not only be your body that’s paying the price for your poor physical health. While your gym membership and a full 8 hours of sleep may have been a top priority when you were unattached – a committed relationship, work, or even kids, can have a way of taking time from things that were once considered essential. The black coffee in your hand and soaring 3-digits on the scale don’t lie! As those numbers get higher, so do your chances of marital dissatisfaction. How can a commitment to get physical lead to better marital health?

Dr. Kristen Wynns is a child and adolescent psychologist who owns a specialty private practice in Cary, North Carolina called Wynns Family Psychology.  She earned her Ph.D. and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from UNC-Greensboro. Dr. Wynns has been frequently sought out as local expert on child psychology and parenting issues for radio shows, magazines like Carolina Parent, as well as TV shows like My Carolina Today and Daytime. Dr. Wynns has also founded the parenting website, No Wimpy Parenting, providing services for parents struggling with behavior and discipline problems. Married for 15 years with two young children of her own, Dr. Wynns likes to say she is “doubly qualified” to offer parenting and marriage advice.

To find out more about Dr. Kristen Wynns and her practice, Wynns Family Psychology, you can visit their website Wynns Family Psychology or call (919) 467-7777 for an appointment. For information regarding the services available to help parents struggling with behavior or discipline problems at home, you can visit Dr. Wynns other site, No Wimpy Parenting.

Rekindling Romance During Family VacationPlay episode Subscribe via RSS Subscribe via iTunesDownload a transcript Sponsored by Rosen Law Firm

Is it possible to have a romantic vacation while also making the most of family time?

Perhaps you and your spouse are wanting to take a family vacation. But maybe you’re fearing that your kids with be antsy and bored, and that you and your partner won’t have any time for romance and fun. So what do you do with this dilemma?

Sometimes couples find themselves having completely kid-focused vacations in order to meet the “family togetherness” needs, but they don’t get a chance to pay attention to the marriage during the time off from work and away from home. Or maybe a couple might plan a romantic getaway without the kids because they find it difficult to work on romance with the children around. Either way, someone (…like your child) or something (…like the romance in your marriage) ends up left out of the mix.

According to today’s guest, Erica Blystone– a licensed clinical social worker with Lepage Associates— there are ways to have your cake and eat it too. You, in fact, can go on a family vacation and work on rekindling the romance in your marriage at the same time, and Erica is here to discuss how and give our listeners some pointers.

To find out more about Erica and her practice, visit their website or call (919) 572-0000 to schedule an appointment.

Picking up the Pieces After InfidelityPlay episode Subscribe via RSS Subscribe via iTunesDownload a transcript Sponsored by Rosen Law Firm

Is it really possible to truly forgive and forget when it comes to infidelity?

Every human has needs. When it comes right down to it, greed can be one of those needs. More often than it should happen, in life, people look at what’s out there and suddenly what they have isn’t enough. As our guest, Dr. Scott Halztman, says, “we live in a culture that says ‘you can have what you want, when you want it.'” This means that there can be a lot left that falls to the wayside when the greed impulse takes over, and oftentimes broken marriages and relationships are left in the wake.

When mistakes are made and hearts are broken, is there ever a way to repair the damage, move on and grow?

Today’s guest says that it is possible to recover from an affair and he has detailed exactly how this can be done in his latest book, The Secrets of Surviving Infidelity.

Certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, Dr. Scott Haltzman is also a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. A graduate of Brown, Scott completed his psychiatric training and chief residency at Yale University before love for his Alma Mater took him back to Rhode Island to serve on the Brown University faculty.

To find out more about Scott and his latest book, The Secrets of Surviving Infidelity, visit his website or check him out on Facebook.